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1951 LEA FRANCIS 14 HP FOUR-LIGHT SALOON
£16,995.00 GBP
INFORMATION ON THIS MODEL
INFORMATION ON THIS VEHICLE
INFORMATION ON LEA FRANCIS
MAKE:
LEA FRANCIS
MODEL:
14 HP FOUR-LIGHT SALOON
BODY TYPE:
4 DOOR SALOON
REGISTRATION NUMBER:
LXK358
DATE OF REGISTRATION:
10/JUNE/1998
YEAR OF MANUFACTURE:
1951
COLOUR:
OLD ENGLISH WHITE
INTERIOR:
BROWN LEATHER
ENGINE / CC:
4 CYL TWIN OHC / 1767 CC
TRANSMISSION:
4 SPEED MANUAL
MILEAGE:
55,522 MILES
CHASSIS NUMBER:
8532
ENGINE NUMBER:
7637
STEERING:
R.H.D.
M.O.T.:
EXEMPT
   
PRICE:
£16,995.00 GBP
LEA FRANCIS 14 HP FOUR-LIGHT SALOON - 4 DOOR SALOON

Supplied by Charles Follett Ltd, Berkley square, London on 9th January 1951.
Super reliable entry level classic.
Suicide front doors.
Lots of invoices for older restoration.
Richard Henry Lea and Graham Inglesby Francis started the business in Coventry in 1895. They branched out into car manufacture in 1903 and motorcycles in 1911. Lea-Francis built cars under licence for the Singer company. In 1919 they started to build their own cars from bought-in components.
From 1922 Lea-Francis had a tie up with Vulcan of Southport sharing manufacturing and dealers. Vulcan supplied bodies to Lea-Francis and in return got gearboxes and steering gear. Two six-cylinder Vulcan designed (and made) cars were marketed as Lea-Francis 14/40 and 16/60 as well as Vulcans. The association finished in 1928 when Vulcan stopped making cars.
A sporting image began to appear from about 1925, leading to models such as the Hyper and the Ace of Spades. The Hyper (also called the S-type) was the first British supercharged production car with a 1.5 litre Meadows engine, and in 1928 a Lea-Francis Hyper won the Ulster TT, a 30-lap race on the 13.5-mile (21.7 km) Ards circuit on the roads of Northern Ireland in the hands of legendary race car driver, Kaye Don. The race was watched by a record 250,000 spectators, and the victory placed Lea-Francis firmly on the map.
The company was re-formed in 1937 under the chairmanship of George Leek with other ex-Riley men such as R.H. Rose who designed a new engine for Lea-Francis which had a similar layout to the Riley 12/4. The 12 hp and the 14 hp (actually 12.9 hp) were introduced in 1937 and continued until the start of the war in 1939 when production ceased and the factory concentrated on manufacturing for the war effort.
Post-war car production commenced in 1946 with updated vehicles based on the pre-war designs. The 14hp Saloon and Sports were luxurious and sporty vehicles, and were popular, if expensive. Eventually an improved chassis with independent front suspension and hydraulic brakes was introduced across the range and in 1950 the 18 h.p. saloon and 2½ litre Sports, both with the more powerful 2½ litre engine, were introduced. Production once again came to a halt in 1954, after not having been present at Earl's Court since 1952.
For 1951 the four-light saloon body fitted to the 14hp ifs chassis was lowered by some two inches, the boot lid opened from the top instead of the bottom, the radiator was lowered, and the headlamps were recessed into the wings. This body design was retained until the end of production of this most popular of Lea-Francis models in 1953.
Detail improvements to the mechanics continued to be made: a new recirculating ball-type steering box (less prone to wear), together with a vacuum advance distributor and revised water pump were introduced during 1951, but hydraulic brakes all round only came in March 1952, being fitted to the last 50 or so examples.